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The Journey from Wagner to Brahms: Performance Markings and Orchestration in the 1873 and 1889 Scores of Bruckner's Third Symphony

Reischmann, Mary Kate (2010)
Honors Thesis (66 pages)
Committee Chair / Thesis Adviser: Karnes, Kevin
Committee Members: Crist, Stephen A ; Hoeyng, Peter
Research Fields: Music; Fine Arts
Keywords: Anton Bruckner; Richard Wagner; Johannes Brahms; "Bruckner Problem"
Program: College Honors Program, Music
Permanent url: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/7tgkp

Abstract

Abstract
The Journey from Wagner to Brahms: Performance Markings and Orchestration in the
1873 and 1889 Scores of Bruckner's Third Symphony
By Mary Kate Reischmann
Scholars have long considered Anton Bruckner's third symphony to be one of the best
representative examples of the "Bruckner Problem", the term given to the complications
presented by the numerous versions in existence of each of Bruckner's works, many of
which contradict one another. The "Problem" has been consistently applied to Bruckner's
Third, particularly in light of the poor reception of the first version of the work printed in
1873. There has been argument that Bruckner's first edition was implicitly Wagnerian
and his subsequent revisions leaned more towards the works of Brahms, as scholars have
postulated that Bruckner made these revisions in order to garner support by revising his
works to emulate those of critic-darling Brahms. However, analysis of the 1873 and 1889
scores reveals that the characteristics of the 1873 score are maintained in the 1889 score,
masked primarily by the overt Brahmsian orchestration and performance markings. I
purport that audiences would receive the 1873 and 1889 versions respectively as
Wagnerian and Brahmsian because of this trend, and not because of a sudden shift in
symphonic influence. Thus, the changes made to the Third symphony are effectively
limited to orchestration rather than structure, suggesting that Bruckner attempted to
counteract negative critical response without enacting fundamental changes to the work.

Table of Contents



Table of Contents


Chapter I: Introduction……………………………………………………………………..1

Chapter II: Survey and Context of Scholarship………………………………11

Chapter III: Biographical Context……………………………………………………20

Chapter IV: Analysis…………………………………………………………………….....32

Chapter V: Conclusions…………………………………………………………………...55

Chapter VI: References…………………………………………………………………...57




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